Osteoporosis

 Osteoporosis is a condition of fragile bone with an increased susceptibility to fracture.

Osteoporosis weakens bone and increases risk of bones breaking.

Bone mass (bone density) decreases after 35 years of age, and bone loss occurs more rapidly in women after menopause.

About 54 million Americans have osteoporosis and low bone mass, placing them at increased risk for osteoporosis. Studies suggest that approximately one in two women and up to one in four men age 50 and older will break a bone due to osteoporosis. 

Symptoms

There typically are no symptoms in the early stages of bone loss. But once your bones have been weakened by osteoporosis, you may have signs and symptoms that include:

Back pain, caused by a fractured or collapsed vertebra
Loss of height over time
A stooped posture
A bone fracture that occurs much more easily than expected
What to avoid for bone health 

  Watching TV

It’s fine to enjoy your favorite show. But its way too easy to spend endless hours in front a screen, nestled on your couch. When it becomes a habit to lounge, you don’t move enough and your bones lay lazy.

Exercise makes them stronger. It’s best for your bones when your feet and legs carry the weight of your body, which forces your bones and muscles to work against gravity.

Overdoing Some Drinks

Too many cola-flavored sodas could harm your bones. While more research is needed, some studies have linked bone loss with both the caffeine and the phosphorous in these beverages. Other experts have suggested that the damage comes when you choose to have a soda instead of milk or other drinks that contain calcium.  Too many cups of coffee or tea can also rob your bones of calcium. 

Too Much Salt

The more salt you eat, the more calcium your body gets rid of, which means it’s not there to help your bones. Foods like breads, cheeses, chips, and cold cuts have some of the highest counts. 

Smoke Breaks bones

When you regularly inhale cigarette smoke, your body can’t form new healthy bone tissue as easily. The longer you smoke, the worse it gets.

Being Underweight

A low body weight means a greater chance of fracture and bone loss. If you’re small-boned, do weight-bearing exercises and ask your doctor if you need more calcium in your diet. If you’re not sure why you’re underweight, ask your doctor about that, too. She can check to see if an eating disorder or another medical condition is the reason.

 If You Take a Tumble in old age

When you tripped as a child, you probably got right back up again. As you get older, though, falls get more dangerous, especially if you have weak bones.

A fracture or broken bone can take a long time to heal. In older adults, it can often be the start of a decline that’s hard to come back from.

When to see a doctor

You may want to talk to your doctor about osteoporosis if you went through early menopause or took corticosteroids for several months at a time, or if either of your parents had hip fractures.

The information contained on this Website should not be used as a substitute for the medical care and advice of your health care provider. There may be variations in treatment that your health care provider may recommend based on individual facts and circumstances.

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